King Of Route 66

 

Publisher: Sega
Hardware: Naomi 2 Cart
Year: 2001
Controls: Driving Controls
Number of Players: 1 Player
Cartridge Image:
Ported To: PS2

 

Dedicated Cabinet:

Description:

The King of Route 66 is the sequel to 18 Wheeler: American Pro Trucker, Sega's previous entry into the wonderful world of truck driving. Originally released in arcades and developed by Sega-AM2, King of Route 66 attempts to improve upon many of 18 Wheeler's shortcomings, adding a few new modes to give the game some much-needed depth and undergoing a graphical overhaul to make better use of the Naomi 2's capabilities. While all of this is well and good, The King of Route 66 still suffers from a lot of its predecessor's problems.

The King of Route 66 is the sequel to 18 Wheeler: American Pro Trucker, Sega's previous entry into the wonderful world of truck driving. Originally released in arcades and developed by Sega-AM2, King of Route 66 attempts to improve upon many of 18 Wheeler's shortcomings, adding a few new modes to give the game some much-needed depth and undergoing a graphical overhaul to make better use of the PlayStation 2's capabilities. While all of this is well and good, The King of Route 66 still suffers from a lot of its predecessor's problems.

When it comes to actual gameplay, King of Route 66 is essentially Crazy Taxi with semis. As you would expect, the trucks themselves aren't the speediest of vehicles, so the racing can, at times, feel a bit sluggish. However, you are provided with nitro containers that can help you speed past opponents any time you find yourself lagging severely. The trouble is, any time you get your truck up to a decent velocity, you tend to lose all ability to properly control the truck, which makes sharp turns nearly impossible. This can be a huge problem, thanks largely to the game's unpredictable difficulty level. While a lot of the missions can be downright simplistic, some of the races against rival truckers are blatantly one-sided, as your opponents tend to have the uncanny ability to breeze past you at a moment's notice. This fact, coupled with the cumbersome controls, leaves you only the slightest margin of error and essentially robs many of the game's missions of most of their fun.

(Description written by: Alex Navarro)

Screen Shots:

back
"1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">back